Sunday, December 24, 2006

TMY EI 1600


This is a photo of my niece, the aptly named, Bella, by my son, Leaf. Leaf was shooting TMY @ EI 1600, in roomlight, with my Minolta XD-11 w/58mm f1.2, handheld. The film developed for about an hour, or so, while I did some other work. I think this combination shows a lot of promise for low light work.


Film: TMY
EI: 1600
Dilution: 1:10
Time: 60:00-75:00
Temp: 70F
scan: Neg

4 comments:

fred said...

It's very promising.
Now I wonder how far we could go with fast films ? I guess we can expect box speed at least.
Do you already have some starting generic times for, let's say, box speed/+1 push/+2 push and so on ?
The increase in speed is probably not linear at all and will depend on the type of film, but some rough guidelines could be interesting.

jdef said...

Hi Fred.

So far, I've seen a 1 stop increase in real speed with the designer-grain films I've tested, including: TMX, TMY, and Acros, and about 2/3 of a stop with traditional, K-grain films like Pan F+ and FP4+. Doubling the development time seems to be a good rule of thumb for a one-stop push. I still have a lot of testing to do for hard data.

Aside from the grain, TMY at EI 1600 doesn't look pushed, to me. There is good shadow detail and near-normal contrast. I think GSD-10 shows a lot of potential for push processing.

fred said...

Hi Jay,

I successfully developed some TMX @200 today. The one stop gain is there indeed, but I wouldn't call the combo grainless for 35mm. Anyway this one was just was testing purpose, as I'm not fond of the TMX tonality.
Tomorrow I'll soup a Tri-X roll at 1600, will probably try a dev time between 45mn and 60mn. I'm still unsure about the agitation frequency I could use. What would be the safest pattern for this test : initial agitation only then stand, or some more inversions /5mn ?
Thanks, Fred

jdef said...

Hi Fred.

I've yet to see streaking or any other development defects when using GSD-10 with any agitation pattern. For push processing, I use stand development for maximum compensation effects. Good luck!